Bücher im Gefängnis

Ein paar Artikel zu Büchern in Gefängnissen in aller Welt:

Katy Bolger: What Paper Means In Prison

As prisoners fight for the most meager civil rights, book ownership may be at the heart of that struggle. In 1987, the Supreme Court decided that, “Prison walls do not form a barrier separating prison inmates from the protections of the Constitution,” granting, even narrowly, a free speech right. In an earlier 1974 decision, the Court ruled that prisons are prohibited from censoring publications even when they are “inflammatory political, racial, religious or other views,” or are “defamatory” or “otherwise inappropriate.” Yet the whims and subjective views and values of prison mailrooms and censorship committees reign in some states.

Arguably there is content that should be banned from prison reading. A lock-picking manual, a book on bomb making, a treatise on white supremacy—these are the types of books widely deemed to threaten the safety of those in the prison and are universally banned.

Alexandra Silver: Restricted Reading: South Carolina Jail Bans All Books Except for the Bible

The Christian Science Monitor reports that Berkeley County Sheriff/defendant H. Wayne DeWitt “maintains that any actions taken at the jail are justified to preserve health and safety, and to further the pursuit of ‘legitimate penological objectives.’ ” By the way, among the books rejected by the jail, according to the ACLU, is one for prisoners called Protecting Your Health and Safety.

Kayla Webley: What Prisoners Are Reading at Gitmo

Indeed, the Harry Potter series has been one the most popular titles among the 18,000 books, magazines, DVDs and newspapers on offer from the prison library at Guantánamo.

Other offerings in the library started in 2003 include the The Lord of the Rings trilogy, the Twilight series and a self-help book called Don’t Be Sad. Prisoners don’t browse the shelves of this particular library; instead, they wait for a weekly visit by a cart of books prison officers think they might be interested in.

Jane Sutton: ’50 Shades’ popular among Guantanamo Bay prisoners

The “Fifty Shades of Grey” series of erotic novels are the favorite reading material among “high-value” prisoners at the Guantanamo detention camp in Cuba, a U.S. congressman said.

Rebecca Ratcliffe: What book would you send to a prisoner?

Regulations introduced by the justice secretary Chris Grayling that stop people sending books to prisoners in England and Wales, have caused outrage among writers, teachers and prison experts. But what titles would they send?

Rami Alhames: Brazil: Prisoners Get Four Days Off Sentence Per Book Read

A change in Brazilian Criminal Law now makes it possible for inmates to reduce their jail sentences by spending time reading and studying. The initiative, called ‘Redemption through Study Time’ (Remição por tempo de estudo in Portuguese) and also known as ‘Redemption through Reading’ (Remição pela Leitura), was sanctioned in June 2012 by President Dilma Rousseff.

Und hier noch der Artikel zur Guantanamo Bay detainment camp library in der englischsprachigen Wikipedia.

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